Professional likes & dislikes


What you’ll like about me

– I’m a professional linguist and the majority of my income comes from translation, editing and interpreting. Translation is not something I do to help make ends meet or fill my afternoons. The fact that I made languages my career makes me all the more eager to invest in my knowledge, tools and expertise and keep abreast of recent trends and developments in the industry. I know my business. If you’ve been searching for a highly‑skilled professional, here I am.

– Years of experience in the capacity of a translation project manager provided me with an in‑depth understanding of the numerous factors one must consider when ordering, delivering or checking a translation: I know what it means to be a vendor, a client or a manager in a translation project and I do my best to make the work easier for everyone involved, no matter which role I find myself in.

– Hassle-free invoicing, something EU-based corporate clients will appreciate most. I’m incorporated, VAT-registered and my invoices comply with all relevant EU regulations.

What you probably won’t like about me

– While being well-qualified to handle legal, commercial and engineering assignments, I’m highly specialised in medical and pharmaceutical translation. Even though my language pairs may not be at the top of demand I’ve managed to build a stable client base that allows me to concentrate on my specialty and not jump at every work opportunity. I have a sense of loyalty to my clients and I’m willing to venture out of my home terrain if a regular client wants me to and I’m allowed enough time to do the necessary homework. But most of the time I prefer to stick to the areas of my greatest professional strength.

I prefer not to accept rush jobs. They are something I normally only do in a stable, long‑term business relationship :)

– I don’t mind a test translation if a prospective client requires one before assigning a project. However, I believe that any project that requires skills so specific they can’t be assessed from a linguists CV, credentials and portfolio, should have a quality-control budget to accommodate the cost of a few passages of translation provided by a shortlist of potential suppliers. In short, I don’t do unpaid test translations anymore.

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